MADE IN AFRICA: PAN AFRICAN MIXER

Eventbrite - MADE IN AFRICA: PAN AFRICAN MIXER

Another edition of Made In Africa: PAN AFRICAN MIXER will be on Thursday April 13. This time we will be celebrating #Zimbabwe |#Senegal|#SouthAfrica | #Togo | #SierraLeone independence together at The Delancey's lounge and private roof top. Get your ticket asap https://madeiapam.eventbrite.com/

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Free RSVP ticket is valid before 7pm on arrival | $10 after 8pm with RSVP at the door.

For more than one ticket, information for each attendee must be provided.

No refundable ticket. General Amission $20

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Strictly Enforced Dress Code: No T-Shirts, Hats, or Tennis shoes.

Ankara Wear, Professional or Cocktail only.

Age Limit(21)

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Come early for great happy hour drink specials:(6pm – 8:00pm):

$2 off beer and wine.

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Direction: F Train to Delancey Station J Train to Essex Station

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Meet 4 African Women Who Are Changing The Face Of Coffee

If you're a coffee drinker, chances are the cup of java you drank this morning was made from beans that were produced or harvested by women. Women's handprints can be found at every point in coffee production. In fact, on family-owned coffee farms in Africa, about 70 percent of maintenance and harvesting work is done by women, according to an analysis by the International Trade Centre, but only rarely do women own the land or have financial control.

The International Women's Coffee Alliance (IWCA) is trying to change that by giving them access to training and networking, and the opportunity to develop new trade relationships.

 Angele Ciza of Burundi owns her own land on 10 hectares (nearly 25 acres), which holds 26,000 Arabic coffee trees.

Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR We sat down recently with four African women on the cusp of change who were on a trip to Washington, D.C., sponsored jointly by the IWCA and the International Trade Centre's Women in Coffee Project. Here are their stories, in brief.

Angele Ciza of Burundi is ahead of her time; she owns the land she farms on. Her 10-hectare (24.7 acre) coffee plantation in the northern part of the country has some 26,000 trees producing Arabica coffee, and she's also purchased seven washing stations (part of the coffee processing procedure). She's employing about 100 women, and she also helps pay school fees for the children of her employees.

"We work very, very hard," says Ciza. Her vision for lifting more people out of poverty in her region is clear. "If you want to develop Burundi, you develop the women," she says.

Fatima Aziz Faraji agrees. She manages a family coffee farm called Finca Estate in Tanzania. She's pushed for a larger voice for women by filling the seats on coffee oversight boards traditionally reserved for men. For instance, she's getting ready to begin a stint on the Tanzanian Coffee Board, and she's a co-director of the Tanzania Coffee Research Institute.

So what is the IWCA's alliance doing for women in her country? She explains the IWCA is bringing women together who previously had no access to each other, or the outside world.

The International Women's Coffee Alliance (IWCA) is trying to empower women in the coffee sector through training, networking and new trade development.

Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR "The ones [women] who are doing well can help" the ones who are just getting started, she explains. "Some women are resistant because of their culture." They're not used to having financial control, Faraji explains. They need mentors — or "sisters," as she describes other women in coffee — to learn from.

When Immy Kamarade wanted to spend more time with her kids (sound familiar, working moms?), she knew she had to learn a new trade. She quit her job in the medical field and started a coffee business. She says she's now working as hard as ever, but it's more on her own terms. She's established a cooperative of 100 women who are producing and processing coffee in her home country of Rwanda.

"It's a new day for Rwanda," she says. As we've reported before, Rwanda is finding that producing premium coffee pays.

Women there never had access to education or rights to land ownership, but "today a woman owns land like her husband and signs on the land title, and a woman has a right to open a [banking] account."

Kamarade says the IWCA is helping to form connections with the people who are actually buying and consuming her coffee in the U.S. and elsewhere. And through these relationships, "we'll be able to access better markets now," she says.

Mbula Musau of Kenya holds one of the most coveted titles in the coffee industry: certified Q-grader. This means buyers know that she knows her stuff when it comes to grading the quality of a coffee bean. And she's also served as a sensory judge at the World Barista Championship competition.

She now works on the trade and marketing side of the industry, but as a "sister of coffee," as she calls herself, she wants to help empower women involved at all levels of coffee production in her country. "The majority of labor is women," Musua explains. By connecting them with women around the world, "it creates hope." And, she hopes, opportunities, too.

Innovation in Africa: What Young African Women Entrepreneurs Have to Say

How can we support and improve Innovation in Africa? Supporting innovation in Africa is no easy task. Political instability, civil wars, terrorism, and uncertainty often disturb the ecosystem of progress and sustainable development. I meet with three of Africa's most innovative young women entrepreneurs who share their thoughts on how to improve and support innovation. Often, we find that when discussing innovation in Africa, such discussions normally don't include young African voices, particularly that of women and girls. But their voice matters and without the inclusion of African women and girls in such discussions, whether of that involving technology, sustainable development, or innovation -- change cannot happen.

Research conducted by the African Development Bank (AfDB) shows an increase ranging from 10 to 30 percent in the number of women-led enterprises over the last decade. In Uganda alone, women account for 40 percent of businesses (EIU, 2010). As the number of women entrepreneurs and innovators increase, their voices can no longer be ignored. African women and girls have a significant role to play in Africa's economic and innovative transformation.

Nkem Uwaje, Managing Director of FutureSoft Nigeria and winner of the 2012 Etisalat Nigeria Prize for Innovation states, "We can improve innovation in Africa by supporting people with innovative ideas and I think that competitions and contests are a good way to start. African governments and the private sector need to work together to launch more contests and competitions that focus on innovation."

Innovation needs an enabling environment. This means creating hubs where innovators can meet, share ideas, and collaborate. We [youths] need a space where ideas can be incubated and where prototypes can be developed. Without this, we are bound to fail as a continent. In addition, ICT development is very important to Africa's innovation ecosystem and future. ICT is vital to ensuring that Nigeria and Africa will not be left behind. Everyone keeps talking about the digital divide, but instead of bridging it, it keeps on getting bigger. We need government policies that ensure that technology is not a privilege but a basic amenity. My company, Futuresoft is playing its part in making ICT more accessible through our iConnect project."

Entrepreneur and innovator, Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola, CEO at WeCyclers -- a company determined to fix the urban waste management system and focused on giving low-income communities in developing countries a chance to capture value from waste and clean up their neighborhoods through an incentive-based recycling program says, "to improve innovation in Africa, we need to invest more in education.

You cannot innovate when you do not have a good education." Adebiyi-Abiola holds an MBA from MIT, a Master degree from Vanderbilt University, and an undergraduate degree in computer science from Fisk University. She is also a 2013 Echoing Green Fellow. Adebiyi-Abiola continues, "we also need more technology incubators and accelerators. The co-creation hub in Lagos was extremely supportive of my work when I first started. They worked hard to ensure my team's success and development. It will be great to see more hubs throughout Africa -- hubs dedicated to supporting aspiring entrepreneurs."

Founding CEO of Yeigo Communications and ReKindle Learning in South Africa, Rapelang Rabana adds, "to improve and support innovation in Africa, the single most powerful thing to do is to deliver quality broadband internet to the majority of Africans. That, I think, will do a lot more than any 'Ministry of Innovation,' than any innovation fund, or any kind of innovation vehicle that we can think of."

Access to information and communication is the most empowering thing we can do to support innovation. It opens doors for greater innovation in farming, education, health, and financial services." Rabana's company, Yeigo is credited with creating ground-breaking applications and services that took advantage of the internet, mobile and cloud computing technologies to reduce communication costs in South Africa. In 2008, Swiss-headquartered Telfree Group of Companies, a pioneering next-generation telecoms operator, acquired a majority stake in Yeigo, enabling the group to provide the full range of telecommunications services.

As we think about innovation in Africa, let us listen to the voices of young innovators because their voice matters. Young Africans are the future of the continent and their efforts should be supported. More recently, the AWP Network launched an innovative photography contest to showcase how African youths view innovation and entrepreneurship in their local community. To participate in the contest or have other ideas on how to support and improve innovation in Africa, Tweet @Africwomenpower or visit www.awpnetwork.com.

SAA+CEO+Monwabisi+Kalawe+xxx
SAA+CEO+Monwabisi+Kalawe+xxx

SAA CEO Monwabisi Kalawe. Picture: PUXLEY MAKGATHO

LOSS-MAKING South African Airways (SAA) is considering a stake in a Togo-based airline as part of a strategy to develop its West African business.

An SAA team would visit Ghana early next month to assess that country’s potential as a regional hub for SAA-operated flights, SAA CE Monwabisi Kalawe said this week. Setting up a hub in the region is one of the key points for the airline’s long-term turnaround strategy.

Mr Kalawe said the trip was at the invitation of Ghanaian aviation officials, after they had signed an agreement for the Airports Company SA (Acsa) to upgrade airports there.

One of the options under consideration is to partner with Ghanaian investors in acquiring part of Asky, which operates out of the Togolese capital, Lomé, and relocate it to Accra.

Asky (pronounced A-Sky) began commercial operations in 2010, having been formed at the instigation of West African states following the collapse of pan-African airline Air Afrique.

Shares in Asky are held mainly by private-sector investors, although the presence of Ethiopian Airlines as a strategic shareholder could be an obstacle to SAA’s plans.

The Ethiopian national carrier is the fastest-growing African airline and is SAA’s most potent Africa-based competitor.

Mr Kalawe gave no indication of the cost of an Asky deal. SAA has long been waiting for a multibillion-rand capital injection from the Treasury and has been surviving by borrowing against a R5bn government guarantee.

Mr Kalawe also declined to respond to market suggestions that SAA’s losses this year could sharply deteriorate after improving from R703m in 2012 to R425m last year.

He reiterated previous statements that if SAA’s turnaround strategy worked, the airline would break even by 2018-19 before entering a period of sustained profitability.

Mr Kalawe himself has been under fire recently after he was accused of personally trying to buy shares in troubled Senegal Airlines after it proposed that SAA acquire a stake early this year.

After denying the allegations, he was backed up by both the SAA board and former public enterprises minister Malusi Gigaba.

Mr Kalawe said SAA originally wanted to create flight hubs in both East and West Africa, but after deciding the former was almost saturated — mainly through the operations of Ethiopian and Kenyan airlines — decided to concentrate on West Africa.

Nigeria and Senegal were both considered as bases for the region before SAA settled on Ghana.

He said West Africa was under-served by airlines.

An SAA hub in Ghana would make air travel to and within the region more convenient. It would also enable SAA to expand its profitable African services.

If all goes according to plan, West Africa will eventually account for 10% of SAA’s operations, compared to 2% now.

SAA will have to make a decision soon on new long-haul aircraft. Its fleet of wide-body aircraft is less fuel-efficient than new-generation aircraft.

Mr Kalawe confirmed that the aircraft would be leased. "We simply don’t have the money to purchase." SAA hopes to start taking delivery from 2017. "We can’t be profitable without them."

‘Taste of Diamonds’

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Alexander Amosu is not a new name in the world of luxury designs. Known for producing the world’s most expensive suit and diamond-encrusted mobile phones, he has come again. But this time, it is the world’s most expensive champagne. Yes, champagne. Working in collabo with Goût de Diamants luxury champagne brand, he has made the most expensive champagne on earth. How much? Just £1,200,000 and that is about N250 million Nigerian naira.

The drink itself is named ‘Taste of Diamonds’ and has been described as special and unique. The design was made using a Superman-inspired engraving and is crafted from 18-carat white gold weighing almost 48 grammes of solid gold. At the centre is a 19-carat white diamond. Nna, na wa o! Odikwa risky things! It is also engraved with the owner’s name.

This one na real wa abi wetin you think?

Fashion designer- ROSBINNA

ROSBINNA FASHION DESIGNER CREATION INTRODUCTION

Fashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, and makeup. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behavior and the newest creations of textile designers especially here in portharcourt, Nigeria.

ROSBINNA the Litany of style, a rebirth of grandeur and aristocratic opulence into levels sublime. infact, it is a unique designer with taste and class distinctively.

Has this to say in an interview with us ...

What do you think about fashion and style?

i think fashion is the accepted look and good sense of color combinations to suit different occasions ,the prevailing style , fashion fades but style is external.

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What are your arrays of products?

we have introduce diferent arrays of new products like couture, haute couture, ready to wears, lingerie, diamonds , precious stones, rosbinna kiddies , rosbinna hairs, rosbinna bags and shoes, e.t.c

couture ,gowns . tops

lingeries, gold , diamonds etc

 

How do you select the material you used?

firstly, it depends on the individual choice of clothing. Secondly, complexion (eg. dark ,fair ,chocolate skin) and finally , the style to make, eg. not all fabric are good for gown skirt and blouse wrapper and tops .

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laces, wrappers etc

 

what are your advice to upcoming fashion designers?

be focused, determined and mean it , definitely you will surely achieve it.

 

2014-07-01 18.27.49

The Missing Education on Black Hair

"Why does she wear an afro?" "Why is her hair styled that way?" 2014-06-28-6342697021_3e5874e682_z-thumbImage Credit: Pink and Purple, By Dionysius Burton These questions spur a conversation about Afro-textured hair that should be occurring. The lack of this conversation has resulted in discriminatory events, for example, this past week Tiffany Bryan, a 27-year-old cancer survivor from New York, was fired from her job for wearing an Afro. This event is not the first: Within the last 12 months soldiers in the military, grade school students, university students and hard-working members of society have been discriminated against because of their hairstyle. These women wore their hair in Afros, twist, dreadlocks and braids not because of some hair fad, but because these styles are essential for their texture of hair. Each of these events, created by a lack of fundamental knowledge on Black hair, offers an opportunity for us to talk openly about the hair of women of color. If the people that committed these acts of discrimination understood that the morphological differences of Afro-textured hair requires a different type of hair care and hairstyles than other ethnic groups, future events of discrimination can be avoided.

Afro-Textured Hair Is Curly Hair

There are five classifications of Afro-textured hair, all of which are variations of curly hair. These classifications range from a looser curl texture to a tightly curly or coily texture. While the biochemical composition of Afro-textured hair is identical to that of Caucasians and Asians, it is its morphological difference in elasticity and comb-ability that causes Afro-textured hair to have different needs. This curly disposition leaves the hair more susceptible to breakage. Styling tools such as combs and brushes, for example, force the curls to elongate, but the curls naturally resist, resulting in breakage. Delicate care is thus needed to preserve hair growth and avoid hair damage. 2014-06-28-4695073736_56980f83b9_z-thumb Image Credit: Black Girl Kinky Curly Afro Hair, By Steven Depolo The curliness of Afro-textured hair also causes it to have less moisture content than other ethnic groups. Every ethnic group's scalp naturally produces a lubricant called sebum, which is an oily substance that moisturizes and protects the hair follicle. Water is the second source of moisture that all ethnic groups need to moisturize their hair. Both sebum and water travel down the hair shaft to lubricate the hair, but when these two elements are not able to travel all the way down the hair shaft or absorb into the hair strand, it leads to dry hair. The shape of curly hair, especially tightly curly hair, does not create a straight path for sebum and water to travel all the way down the hair shaft -- this is why afro textured hair looses moisture quickly after washing. Dry hair, or hair without moisture, reduces hair pliability and makes it even more difficult to manipulate the hair without breakage, which is one of the reasons that moisture retention is very important for healthy Afro-textured hair.

Afro-textured hair, furthermore, does not benefit from daily washing. When hair is washed everyday it is stripped of its natural essential oils, which leads to dryness and weathering of the hair fiber. People with Afro-textured hair already have naturally dry hair so washing the hair frequently only increases this dryness and leads to damage.

Hair Care and Styling that Promotes Health 2014-06-28-4886397967_20f0989b31_z-thumbImage Credit: Hair Braiding, By Steven Depolo "Why won't they just keep their hair straight?"

As explained Afro-textured hair is naturally curly, and there are only two options to keep the hair straight, chemical straightening or heat straightening, both of which severely damage the hair fiber. Chemical straightening, also referred to as relaxers, physically and chemically changes the hair fiber. It damages the hair cuticles by opening up the hair shaft, which makes the hair strand very vulnerable to damage. It also causes damage to the scalp, and since the chemicals in relaxers are said to be toxic there are other health problems associated with its use. Heat straightening with blow dryers and flat irons also damage the hair by harming the hair cuticles and leads to the same problems as a chemical straightener. Keeping Afro-textured hair straight can be unhealthy for the hair, and in the case of a chemical straightener can also be unhealthy for the body. Straightening the hair is a choice not a requirement.

Due to the fact that Afro-textured hair is more susceptible to breakage, and cannot easily be straightened without damaging the hair, individuals of color have to wear hairstyles that promote healthy hair, such as dreadlocks, twist, braids, updos, etc. These styles are also referred to as protective hairstyles, because these hairstyles can be worn for longer periods without constant manipulation of the hair. This is one of reasons why the U.S. military's ban on solders and personnel wearing dreadlocks, braids or twisted hairstyles is unhealthy and discriminatory. Without these styling options, the only options available to them are chemical or heat straighteners that can damage their hair. In addition, the ease of these protective hairstyles allow these women to focus on being a soldier and not worry about straightening their hair.

When Afro-textured hair is washed and not styled, it naturally forms into the coiffe that is known as the Afro. Thus, when Vanessa Van Dyke and Tiffany Bryan wear an Afro, they are wearing their hair the way it naturally grows from their head. Or when grade school students, such as those at Deborah Brown Community School, Tulsa Okla., and Horizon Science Academy, Lorain Ohio wear their hair in Afro puffs they are simply taking their natural Afros and styling them just like little girls who wear pigtails or ponytails. Should pigtails and ponytails be banned too? Of course the answer is no, because we are taking away hairstyles that are widely accepted and healthy for the hair. 2014-06-28-6255645763_4c387d3553_z-thumb Image Credit: I love My Hair 2, By Dionysius Burton

In the last decade, women of color have increasingly chosen to wear their natural curly hair over straightened hair. This has resulted in YouTube channels, blogs and other online outlets dedicated to teaching women how to care for their hair. The hair industry has also shifted, there are now more products specifically marketed and geared to women who wear natural hair. The media and print, furthermore, now advertise more women with natural hair because of its widespread acceptance.

Hopefully, understanding these fundamentals about Afro-textured hair will help the U.S. military, schools and employers acknowledge that natural Black hair has a morphological difference that requires different needs than other ethnic groups, and in order to maintain the health of Afro-textured hair it needs to wear hairstyles that promote health.

Kimika Hudson is the founder of www.curlyhairschool.com a platform that helps women with kinky curly hair find the right tools and methods for their individual hair needs through online hair courses.

Follow Kimika Hudson on Twitter: www.twitter.com/curlyhairschool Kimika Hudson Founder of Curly Hair School

5 Rules for Texting Anyone You Do Business With

African-businessmeeting1Walk into any boardroom two minutes before a meeting and you’ll find the same scenario: a table full of executives checking their phones with their heads bowed in the “smartphone prayer.”

Text messaging is the fastest way to communicate in business. Quicker than email and more convenient than a phone call, it’s become commonplace. But it’s not always the best choice.

Choose to text message for simple notifications or reminders like “I’m running five minutes late,” or “Remember to bring the report.” As a general rule, consider texting only appropriate for a maximum of two messages -- one message and one reply.

Here are five rules to avoid a text message business blunder.

1. Keep it positive.

Like email, the tone of a text message can be misinterpreted by the recipient. Quick messages can make you come off as flippant or harsh. Instead of staccato phrases, write complete sentences. Add polite touches like “please” and “thank you.” Re-read every message before pressing send to double-check your tone (bonus: no embarrassing typos).

Related: Business Dining: The Do's and Don'ts of Splitting the Check

2. Avoid serious topics.

You wouldn’t break up with your girlfriend over a text message -- to be clear, you should not -- and the same goes for business. Never give negative feedback or fire someone via a text message. Any serious conversation should take place face-to-face. It allows for subtle interaction through facial expressions and will ensure clear communication.

3. Don’t abbreviate every other word.

Abbreviations are common in casual texts, but you should be careful how often you use them. Common abbreviations like “LOL” (laugh out loud) and “np” (no problem) are safe choices. However, if you’re communicating with a new customer or acquaintance, take 30 extra seconds and type out each word.

Avoid informal shortcuts like “u” (you) and less common abbreviations like “SMH” (shaking my head) or “MFW” (my face when). Don’t leave your clients and colleagues confused; your texts should convey messages quickly and clearly.

Related: 5 Ways to Be a Better Listener

4. Don’t text a last-minute cancellation.

There are a thousand reasons someone may miss a text message. Don’t depend on a quick note to cancel a meeting or change a lunch venue. For an important or time-sensitive message, pick up the phone.

5. Double-check the autocorrect.

Smart phones can occasionally be a little too smart. Autocorrect and voice-to-text features have a sneaky way of changing your intended message into something entirely different and often embarrassing. When using voice-to-text, ensure you’re in a quiet location. It picks up on background noise and may type a nearby conversation instead of what you’re saying.

Originally posted on http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/231379

Congo sapeurs: Is the Guinness ad true to life?

The new Guinness ad featuring superbly dressed Congolese men has been getting a lot of attention since its release earlier this week, writes Tanvi Misra. But how closely do the sashaying and stout-swigging characters in the ad match reality? The ad follows the men as they shed their working clothes and transform themselves into polished, hat-wearing, cane-wielding style moguls - because, as the narrator says, "in life, you cannot always choose what you do, but you can always choose who you are."

Costume designer Mr Gammon took 28 suitcases of elegant kit to the shoot with members of the Congolese Society of Ambianceurs and Elegant Persons (SAPE) - sapeurs, as they are known. The main idea was to be true to the sapeur look, but also, "kind of, heighten it a bit," Gammon says. "I wasn't redesigning them."

Photographer Per-Anders Pettersson who spent five days with sapeurs in Kinshasa in 2012 says the picture portrayed in the ad is pretty accurate._72344408_guinness_grab624b [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-3sVWOxuXc&w=560&h=315]

Visit BBC for more news

The Cardiopad: invented by young African to save lives

Africa+Rising

A young Cameroonian engineer has built the first fully touch screen medical tablet that could soon save many African lives. He first has to find the necessary funding to mass-produce the device.

by Anne Mireille Nzouankeu, Yaoundé

In a country that has only 30 heart surgeons for more than 20 million people, the dream of Arthur Zang, a 24-year-old Cameroonian engineer, is to facilitate the treatment of patients with a heart disease across Cameroon.

Save lives In 2010, he created a digital tablet known as Cardiopad: “It’s the first fully touch screen medical tablet made in Cameroon and in Africa. It’s an invention that could save numerous human lives”, explains Arthur Zang.

In fact, Cameroon’s thirty heart specialists are all based in either Douala or Yaoundé, the country’s economic and political capitals. Heart patients often have to travel across the country for a consultation. Appointments sometimes must be made months in advance, leading to death of some patients.

Hassle of travelling The Cardiopad solves this problem by enabling medical examinations to be performed remotely and the results transmitted electronically, saving patients the hassle of having to travel to the city.

Arthur Zang explains that the Cardiopad is above all a scientific project. He started his research three years ago and carried out several scientific tests that were validated by the Cameroonian scientific community. “The reliability of the Cardiopad is 97.5%”, he says.

Distance consultation In practice, the Cardiopad is a device that can perform tests such as the electrocardiogram (ECG). The medical tablet also makes it possible to wirelessly send the results of the tests from remote locations to the specialist who will then interpret them.

“The tablet is used as a classical electrocardiograph device: electrodes are placed on the patient and connected to a module that, in turn, connects to the tablet. When a medical examination is performed on a patient in a remote village, for example, the results are transmitted from the nurse’s tablet to that of the doctor who then interprets them.

Digitalised and transmitted Software built into the device allow the doctor to give computer assisted diagnosis”, explains the young engineer. Untitled

Pointing out the differences between the Cardiopad and the classical electrocardiograph, Arthur Zang explains: “The Cardiopad has more functions. With the classical electrocardiograph, the results were usually printed on paper and handed to the cardiologist for interpretation.

It wasn’t possible to send or save the results electronically. With the Cardiopad, the results are digitalised and transmitted. There is no need to print them, the heart surgeon can interpret them, even remotely, from his tablet and then send the diagnosis and prescribed treatment”

Accessibility “The Cardiopad will cut down the cost of examination. We intend to sell the device for 1500 euros, while the current price for an electrocardiograph device is 3800 euros. If hospitals purchase the device at a low price, they will be able to lower the prices of medical examinations”, Arthur Zang hopes.

However, there is still the issue of energy, as many of the country’s remote regions do not have access to electricity. “The Cardiopad is equipped with a battery that can independently power the machine for more than seven hours”, the engineer assures.

He further explains that a prototype and sample of device is already available. “We are currently producing the first units of the device which will be available for hospitals before July”, says the young engineer who is still looking for funding to mass-produce the Cardiopad. “Besides the funding, I am also looking to start a company to help improve the medical care system in Cameroon”, he concludes.

Professor Samuel Kinguè

Professor Samuel Kinguè, who is the head of the cardiology unit of the Yaoundé General Hospital, has tested and endorsed the Cardiopad:

“I have tested the Cardiopad and the results are quite satisfactory. According to World Health Organisation (WHO), cardiovascular diseases are the primary cause of death in western countries and will soon become a huge concern for African countries as well. Therefore, an invention like the Cardiopad should be supported. It has numerous advantages: it allows distance consultations and can also be adjusted for the treatment of other diseases”.

Israel sending 50 executives to foster investment in Africa

Posted on June 16, 2014 by JNS.org. (JNS.org) The Israeli government is sending 50 executives on a tour of Africa in an effort to grow the Jewish state’s business presence in that region during an era of a growing Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement in other parts of the world. The Israeli government want to invest in Africa (pictured on map) to diversify its economy and counter the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which has let to businesses around the world boycotting the Jewish state. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

The Israeli government want to invest in Africa (pictured on map) to diversify its economy and counter the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which has let to businesses around the world boycotting the Jewish state. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman wants Israel to make deals in economically growing countries for companies such as defense contractor Elbit Systems Ltd., irrigation equipment maker Netafim Ltd., and billionaire Idan Ofer’s Israel Chemicals Ltd., which has already invested in a $642 million potash mining project in Ethiopia.

Israel’s sub-Saharan exports amounted to $1.4 billion last year, nearly four times the exports to the region in 2003, reported Business Week.

“When you look at the map, you see growth in the sub-Saharan countries that is even greater than in Asia and that offers a great deal of opportunity for Israeli companies,” said Shauli Katznelson, director of the economic division at the Israel Institute for Export and International Cooperation in Tel Aviv.

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The Israeli government want to invest in Africa (pictured on map) to diversify its economy and counter the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which has let to businesses around the world boycotting the Jewish state. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

In Search of the Internet in Burkina Faso

planetfacebook_660“Planet Facebook.” Image: dullhunk/Flickr

The past decade is often characterized by the immense expansion of a new phenomenon taking over the globe: The World Wide Web. The Internet has become a standard in North American life, contributing to and facilitating daily activities from shopping and reading the newspaper, all the way to building professional relationships, finding jobs, and even dating. It shapes the way we live our lives on a personal level, as well as in a professional environment. Many people cannot imagine going several hours without checking their email or updating their choice of social media site, let alone going offline for a month, or even a year.

However, monthly and even annual Internet access is a novelty for well over half of the world’s population. My daughter, Heather Sherlock, a sophomore at the University of Ottawa, is studying International Development and Globalization, so this is a topic that is very near and dear to her heart. We were recently discussing what life looked like in countries where many people have never even come close to accessing the Internet, and I had one of those proud fatherly moments as she educated me about Burkina Faso.

Burkina Faso is a small nation in the North West of Africa, wedged between Mali, Niger and four other nations that make up the so-called armpit of Africa. Known for its alarmingly low living standards, it comes as no surprise that only 3 percent of the country’s population has regular access to the Internet. With the majority of people living in small villages throughout the country, Internet is often limited to larger cities, and even then, the connection is slow, unreliable, and rarely worth its elevated cost in a country where GDP per capita is only $1400.

It seems that there’s a gaping hole in the World Wide Web, a hole that is affecting 97 percent of Burkinabes in a country that could benefit extensively from a bit of time online. Heather’s friend John, a born-and-raised Burkinabe, gave us some answers.

John Hanks, a 19-year-old student from Ouagadougou, is among the lucky 3 percent of Burkinabes to have regular access to Internet, and is one of only 40,000 Facebook users in the country. This comes at a cost, though; as John explained that he spends $100 a month for 3 mbps, although the speed of his Internet is often less than half of what is promised. (By way of comparison, people in the U.S. enjoy average speeds of 8.6 mpbs and, in South Korea, 14.2 mbps.) John added that those who can afford it will sometimes visit cyber cafes, which have sprung up all around the major cities, but even still, the connection is slow and the price is much higher than many are able to pay.

Although cost and quality are important factors playing into lack of Internet access, they are factors that plague a large percentage of the developing world; yet very few countries face the same alarming Internet rates found in Burkina Faso. This could be due to one of Burkina Faso’s most alarming statistics of all: a literacy rate of 29 percent. The Internet, based largely on a collection of key words, would be little help to people who cannot even write their own names. Furthermore, the country faces poverty so extreme that much of its population lacks the most basic human rights, with limited resources to ensure access to water, food and even shelter. Internet access, which has recently become a hot topic among the United Nations Human Rights Council, seems to have fallen behind water and warmth on the government’s lengthy priority list.

But should the Internet fall so far behind? Sure, a starving Burkinabe child cannot eat the Internet to subside his hunger. Wifi won’t bring rain to the expansive drought gripping much of Burkina Faso’s countryside. But examples are far and wide of how the Internet is saving lives around the globe. Websites like freerice.com are using the Internet to feed the world’s hungry by incorporating rice donation into online trivia games. In Mumbai, India, Dabbawallahs, cycling food distributors, have used the Internet to launch a campaign of food sharing to help feed children in nearby slums, saving approximately two lives a day. Even the UN has launched numerous online campaigns with their World Food Programme, designed to create opportunities for anyone with access to the Internet to join the fight against world hunger.

The Internet, it seems, is doing more than facilitating online shopping in North America; it is saving lives around the globe. In a country where food and water distribution is struggling to meet its demand, it may be beneficial for the government to consider the possibilities of the World Wide Web. Originally posted by: Gary Sherlock.The CEO of Peer 1 Hosting.

SAA looks at Togo airline to expand in West Africa

SAA+CEO+Monwabisi+Kalawe+xxxSAA CEO Monwabisi Kalawe. Picture: PUXLEY MAKGATHO

LOSS-MAKING South African Airways (SAA) is considering a stake in a Togo-based airline as part of a strategy to develop its West African business.

An SAA team would visit Ghana early next month to assess that country’s potential as a regional hub for SAA-operated flights, SAA CE Monwabisi Kalawe said this week. Setting up a hub in the region is one of the key points for the airline’s long-term turnaround strategy.

Mr Kalawe said the trip was at the invitation of Ghanaian aviation officials, after they had signed an agreement for the Airports Company SA (Acsa) to upgrade airports there.

One of the options under consideration is to partner with Ghanaian investors in acquiring part of Asky, which operates out of the Togolese capital, Lomé, and relocate it to Accra.

Asky (pronounced A-Sky) began commercial operations in 2010, having been formed at the instigation of West African states following the collapse of pan-African airline Air Afrique.

Shares in Asky are held mainly by private-sector investors, although the presence of Ethiopian Airlines as a strategic shareholder could be an obstacle to SAA’s plans.

The Ethiopian national carrier is the fastest-growing African airline and is SAA’s most potent Africa-based competitor.

Mr Kalawe gave no indication of the cost of an Asky deal. SAA has long been waiting for a multibillion-rand capital injection from the Treasury and has been surviving by borrowing against a R5bn government guarantee.

Mr Kalawe also declined to respond to market suggestions that SAA’s losses this year could sharply deteriorate after improving from R703m in 2012 to R425m last year.

He reiterated previous statements that if SAA’s turnaround strategy worked, the airline would break even by 2018-19 before entering a period of sustained profitability.

Mr Kalawe himself has been under fire recently after he was accused of personally trying to buy shares in troubled Senegal Airlines after it proposed that SAA acquire a stake early this year.

After denying the allegations, he was backed up by both the SAA board and former public enterprises minister Malusi Gigaba.

Mr Kalawe said SAA originally wanted to create flight hubs in both East and West Africa, but after deciding the former was almost saturated — mainly through the operations of Ethiopian and Kenyan airlines — decided to concentrate on West Africa.

Nigeria and Senegal were both considered as bases for the region before SAA settled on Ghana.

He said West Africa was under-served by airlines.

An SAA hub in Ghana would make air travel to and within the region more convenient. It would also enable SAA to expand its profitable African services.

If all goes according to plan, West Africa will eventually account for 10% of SAA’s operations, compared to 2% now.

SAA will have to make a decision soon on new long-haul aircraft. Its fleet of wide-body aircraft is less fuel-efficient than new-generation aircraft.

Mr Kalawe confirmed that the aircraft would be leased. "We simply don’t have the money to purchase." SAA hopes to start taking delivery from 2017. "We can’t be profitable without them."

Mansa Musa Of Mali Named World's Richest Man Of All Time; Gates And Buffet Also Make List

When we think of the world's all-time richest people, names like Bill Gates, Warren Buffet and John D Rockefeller immediately come to mind. But few would have thought, or even heard of, Mansa Musa I of Mali – the obscure 14th century African king who was today named the richest person in all history.

You've probably never heard of him, but Mansa Musa is the richest person ever.

The 14th century emperor from West Africa was worth a staggering $400 billion, after adjusting for inflation, as calculated by Celebrity Net Worth. To put that number into perspective -- if that's even possible -- Net Worth's calculations mean Musa's fortune far outstrips that of the current world's richest man Carlos Slim Helu and family.

According to Forbes, the Mexican telecom giant's net worth is $69 billion. Slim edges out the world's second wealthiest man, Bill Gates, who is worth $61 billion, according to Forbes. article-2218025-1584BC80000005DC-386_306x351 Some of the oldest fortunes in question date back 1,000 years. No. 7 on the list, for example, is William the Conqueror. The illegitimate son of the Duke of Normandy, William lived between 1028-1087 and gained infamy for invading and seizing England in 1066.

According to the Encyclopedia Brittanica, when Musa died sometime in the 1330s, he left behind an empire filled with palaces and mosques, some of which still stand today. But the emperor really turned historic heads for the over-the-top extravagances of his 1324 pilgrimage to Mecca.

The trip, which he embarked up on during the 17th year of the monarch's glittering reign, was hosted by the leaders of both Mecca and Cairo and apparently was so brilliant, it "almost put Africa’s sun to shame."

Musa's wealth was a result of his country's vast natural resources. The West African nation was responsible for more than half of the world's salt and gold supply, according to Net Worth. Of course, the entry also notes that the fortune was also fleeting. Just two generations later, his net worth was gone -- wasted away by invaders and infighting.

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Wine Production in East Africa

BC-Dodoma-Imagi-01 With the vine’s versatility and humans love for wine, it should come as no surprise that someone out there has attempted to produce wine in almost every part of the world. Add the hard-working nature we East Africans are inherently born with, and you can bet we have had our go at it as well! In fact, we started decades ago…

I’m sure most of you will be quick to point out that “wine” in such regions is normally made from papaya, banana, pineapple and other tropical fruits. That is true; however in this instance I am talking strictly about wine produced from grapes that were, furthermore, locally grown.

Tanzania is leading by sheer volume of production. Dodoma is the prominent wine region where major wine producers such as Tanzania Distillers Ltd (producers of Konyagi), Dodoma Wine Company and Cetawico Ltd are based. They have given rise to brands such as Dodoma, Imagi, Presidential and Altar Wine.